O-ORALiTea is here! (guidelines)

Greetings! ΧΑΙΡΕ! Salve!

O-ORALiTea is here!
 Every spring for the last 15 years, students and faculty from Haverford and Bryn Mawr (and sometimes beyond) have gathered to perform favorite moments from Greek and Latin literature (Oral Recitation of Ancient Literature + Tea). This year we’ll come together with a virtual, blended twist on ORALiTea, in which teams — classes or groups of like-minded enthusiasts — will record brief, collaborative performances of our favorite texts. We’ll stitch the pieces together into a wonderful, kaleidoscopic performance that will be shared with the community later this month!

How?

To participate in O-ORALiTea, all you need to do is record a short clip of you reading a part of an ancient text or passage and share it with us.

When & Where: World Premier on the afternoon of April 21st(Rome’s birthday!) You can join us on-line then or check out the performances on the department’s (new) blog. (details to follow).

Clips should be submitted no later than April 14th.

The basic process is simple:

  1. pick a passage with your class or among a few friends;
  2. divvy up the passage into short, roughly equal segments;
  3. each member of your team records themselves performing their lines
  4. email the recording to our video-maestro, Joshua Bayona (jbayona@haverford.edu); be sure to include who is in the clip and what section of what text is being read.
  5. we’ll edit the clips together into a performance!

Other guidelines and suggestions:

  • if you have any questions, please contact Prof. Mulligan (bmulliga@haverford.edu)
  • you can use your phone, etc. to record your clip
  • keep your clips short: a few lines or a sentence of text = ideal
  • video clips are preferable but audio is ok in pinch (you can send along a picture to accompany your audio, if you like)
  • the default recording format should be “selfie-style” or “Zoom/Teams-standard”;  but if you have a reason for a different format that’s ok too!
  • Be sure to include your name and what you’ve recited in your email.
  • Costumes, fun props, etc. are warmly encouraged — but not required.
  • You don’t have to memorize your clip — but you can.
  • Your passage should be in a historical language. Latin and Greek are typical; but others are welcome!
  • If you would like to help with editing the clips together, let Prof. Mulligan know! (bmulliga@haverford.edu)blog
  • Have fun!

Here’s an example of how you might divvy up a text…
say there’s a team of 5 students (you and 4 others) who like playful birds and so decide to recite Catullus 2.

Maybe y’all each take two lines….

You:
Passer, deliciae meae puellae,
quicum ludere, quem in sinu tenere,

2:
cui primum digitum dare appetenti
et acris solet incitare morsus,

3:
cum desiderio meo nitenti
carum nescio quid lubet iocari

4:
et solaciolum sui doloris,
credo ut tum gravis acquiescat ardor:

5:
tecum ludere sicut ipsa possem
et tristis animi levare curas!

… or maybe they alternate lines:

You:
Passer, deliciae meae puellae,
2:
quicum ludere, quem in sinu tenere,
3:
cui primum digitum dare appetenti
4:
et acris solet incitare morsus,
5:
cum desiderio meo nitenti
You:
carum nescio quid lubet iocari
2:
et solaciolum sui doloris,
3:
credo ut tum gravis acquiescat ardor:
4:
tecum ludere sicut ipsa possem
5:
et tristis animi levare curas!